Tag Archives: Jude Law

Online at last: watch Rudy Law in Suzie Lovitt

15 Jun
A then eight-year-old Rudy Law stars as Suzie Lovitt

A then eight-year-old Rudy Law stars as Suzie Lovitt

At last! A short film I helped out on a few years ago has been put online for free viewing on Nowness.com. Suzie Lovitt is a quirky, avant-garde, ravishingly shot film starring a young Rudy Law, son of Sadie Frost (who produced the film) and Jude Law.

Rudy liked to make up characters, and in particular liked to “channel” the character of a middle-aged dry cleaner called Suzie Lovitt. When director Ben Charles Edwards saw him “doing” Suzie, he knew he had to put Rudy’s rich fantasy inner world on screen. I helped out with redrafting and restructuring Ben’s initial script, though much of it was jettisoned on the day to let Rudy do his own thing. Just don’t take the stories of family life in it to be a true reflection of the Frost household – that’s all fiction! In other words, it’s not Rudy playing the part of Suzie Lovitt, but Rudy playing the part of another boy who likes to play the part of Suzie Lovitt. Very meta.

Rudy proved to be such a natural on film that Ben, Sadie and I developed another short specially for him. That’s Dotty, my favourite of all the shorts I’ve been involved in, and I’m incredibly excited to say that it too will go online on Nowness.com later this week – watch this space!

Ben Charles Edwards has since made his debut feature film with Sadie Frost and Emma Comley’s production company Blonde to Black, out next year. Set The Thames On Fire is like a darker version of Withnail & I set in a retro-Dickensian dystopian future London. This one is written by musician Al Joshua, and I have no vested interest in it beyond a cameo in a party scene, so you can believe me when I say that, having seen a (very) rough cut, it promises to be one of the most bizarre and visually striking films you’ll ever see.

To watch Suzie Lovitt, click here.

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See my short, Dotty, for free! Plus: amazing new feature Set The Thames On Fire

6 Nov
Dotty, starring Sadie Frost and her son Rudy Law

Dotty, starring Sadie Frost and her son Rudy Law

If you’re in London this Saturday lunchtime, grab the chance to watch Dotty on the big screen – for free! Dotty is a truly lovely short film that I dreamed up and Ben Charles Edwards directed, about a troubled young boy growing up in Nevada in the ‘60s who forges a life-changing friendship with an eccentric lady in a mysterious trailer in the desert. I was very loosely inspired in writing it by Harold and Maude, and there’s a reveal at the end that still sends chills up my spine, thanks in part to a haunting Danny Elfmanesque score by Paul Honey.

Sadie Frost won a well-deserved Best Actress award in the title role from the Hollywood Reel Independent Film Festival (I flew over for that, see here), and the boy is touchingly played by her real-life son by Jude Law, Rudy Law. Dotty has screened in 20-odd festivals round the world already, and this is its second London outing, following Raindance. It’s showing as part of the Fringe! Queer Film and Arts Festival, now in its tenth year, together with four other shorts under the themed of “Growing Pains”. Tickets are free, but you should book them in advance here.

I can’t be there in person, sadly. I’m going back to my old Oxford college for its Careers Day, to give advice to students contemplating a future in journalism. That advice, incidentally, distilled to its essentials, is THERE IS NO FUTURE IN JOURNALISM! RUN AWAY! RUN AWAY!

Set The Thames posterDotty’s visionary young director Ben Charles Edwards has since made his feature-film debut, with Sadie Frost, Emma Comley and Andrew Green as producers. I’ve seen some rushes, and it looks extraordinary (and not just because I am in it, briefly, playing a music producer in a huge quifftastic hat). It’s like a darker version of Withnail & I set in a retro-Dickensian dystopian future London, and it’s called Set The Thames On Fire. The screenplay is by the very talented musician Al Joshua, whose recent showcase gig  I wrote about here.

Check out the amazing pics for Set Thames On Fire on the new website.

Despatch from Hollywood: the day before the world premiere of our film Dotty

12 Feb
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Dotty, premiering at the Hollywood Reel Independent Film Festival tomorrow

So here I am in West Hollywood. The sky is as ridiculously blue as it almost always is – that’s partly why the first film pioneers chose this place. I’m staying with hospitable fellow film journo and screenwriter Steve Goldman. And tomorrow the short film I wrote, Dotty, is having its world premiere at the Hollywood Reel Independent Film Festival, with Florida, Australia, St Albans and New York so far to follow.

I’m really proud of the film. Ben Charles Edwards, with whom I collaborated on the hugely ambitious Animal Charm, did a superb job of directing. Sadie Frost is so good she’s being awarded Best Actress at the festival – despite Juliet Stevenson also being in the running. The specially composed score still echoes in my mind.

I can’t tell you too much about the plot of Dotty, as it would spoil the ending, but it’s a touching inter-generational friendship between a lonely, troubled boy and the eccentric woman (‘Dotty’) he finds in a colourful caravan plonked in the middle of the dusty Nevada desert. I had the cult 1971 film Harold and Maude half in mind when I wrote it. I’ve shown it to septuagenarians and nine-year-olds, and all ages in between, and it seems to strike a universal chord.

One great lesson when writing it: less is more. The first draft was 10pp long – half the length of Animal Charm. It was deliberately light on dialogue, since it stars a nine-year-old kid. And though that kid is Rudy Law, son of Sadie Frost and Jude Law and with acting clearly in his genes, you still can’t ask too much of children in the way of scripted dialogue.

I got one note back on the script: make it shorter, with less dialogue. It was a great note. The even more stripped-down 6pp version worked even better.

And now, tomorrow, The Hollywood Reel Independent Film Festival gives Dotty its first showing to critical fellow film-makers, ones who aren’t cast or crew or friends or family. I’m not nervous. With my film critic’s hat on, rather than my insecure writer’s hat on, Dotty works. It’s good.

I’ll tell you on Friday how it all went…  

 

#8: Secret Cannes diary of a Time Out Editor, aged 33¼

24 May
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Continuing the extracts from my Cannes diary from 1997. This time: partying on the Soho House boat with a young Anna Friel, Sadie Frost, Jude Law, David Thewlis…
May 10. Woke up at 9, or so I thought — my watch had stopped, and it turned out to be 12.30. Started off feeling terrible, then thought hey! It’s Cannes! And the sun is shining! And immediately became annoyingly cheerful.Forced down some bread and pate, then watched Jon and Paul (Ronson and Kaye, see previous blog) rehearse the new character Jon’s been writing for him. I giggled in the kitchen, even though I’d heard the jokes before; Paul’s delivery brought them to life.

Nothing planned till 5.30, so spent much of the afternoon wandering up the Croisette, where the crowds prevent you moving any faster than a zombie, and overheard a smart French woman tourist say, “Oh, mais il n’y a même pas des starlets nues.” Bought a phonecard and phoned Jonathan Rutter of DDA to beg tix for a party the next evening, which he said he was giving to only three people, Jon and I being two, then off to join the Young British Talent.

Normally you can’t get into the colossal Palais des Festivals without an accredited pass. Bureaucracy is such that I had prepared a speech in French for when I was inevitably  refused entry despite having a printed invitation to the roof-top reception, but no problems. There are gorgeous views from up there, and the view improved even more when the Brits arrived.

They’d all been styled in designer gear, and looked stunning: Joely Richardson in a ’30s-looking, calf-length shimmery dress; Sadie Frost with little horns, a tattoo, and killer blue eyes (and later in bare feet); Anna Friel (above) thin and poised in a black dress with plunging back, behaving like a naughty schoolgirl during the speech and making signs to Sadie; Catherine McCormack in Doc Marten’s beneath her dress; and then the boys — Rufus Sewell, Jude Law, Jon’s friend James Frayn — all dressed to kill in Paul Smith tuxes and exuding a raffish charm.

I introduced myself to Anna Friel and thanked her for being kind to Brian Case (Time Out‘s legendary Senior Editor) when he went on location recently for Landgirls. Brian had told me he was worried that his drinker’s reputation had preceded him, because Anna always seemed to have a bottle of wine to offer, even in the morning; but she said that’s just what she always did, with a deliberately insouciant air that shouted “See? I may come from the soaps but I’m a bad girl, really!”

Jon turned up late, and still gloomy, having a Bad Birthday. He introduced me to ??, head of MTV, who had produced his Jon Ronson Mission, and cheered up  when I told him the young stars were all off to dinner at the Soho House boat — so we could mosey along and somehow inveigle our way in…. which we did.

Barry Norman (the BBC film critic) was standing proud on the top deck, gazing into the distance like an Admiral, very much in command and in his element. We ligged into the bar area for free champagne and Sea Breezes, where Jon had two coups and two foot-in-mouths.

Catherine McCormack was effusive in her praise of Jon’s Omar documentary (earlier he’d said his great ambition was to meet Mike Leigh, but he was too frightened he’d snub him. I had joked that he’d probably say “Jon Ronson! I’m a great admirer of your films…”). This delighted him, though he spoilt the warm glow by saying to her, in the end, “So what do you do?” Oops. Mind you, I hadn’t realised she had starred in Braveheart, either.

Same with David Thewlis, who actually sought Jon out to praise him for his documentary; but when Jon started going on about meeting David’s ex-wife, and how he really liked her, it spolit the mood…

I meanwhile patched things up with Richard Jobson, who I worried might bear a grudge for a nasty Sideline in Time Out years back making fun of his dyslexia, which at the time made him furious. But no: he wanted to make a deal with Time Out to help out with his series of London movies [our News Editor Tony Thompson eventually co-produced with him], and sorted us out with VIP tix to the massive MTV party that night…

In the next episode, a fight breaks out at the MTV party… click here to read