Tag Archives: Life on Mars

Gained in translation: top 10 adaptations of foreign films

5 Jun

We’ve all heard of “lost in translation”. But what about “gained in translation”? It can happen. A good friend, Frank Wynne, is an award-winning translator of novels who often picks up errors and infelicities and corrects them along the way. I can’t always judge the quality of the original prose, but I can say his books read wonderfully.

What of film? I was asked this question by someone at www.smartling.com, who specialise in translation software. They clearly want to promote their product (so: Smartling! Smartling! Smartling!), but since I find the question intriguing, I’m happy to answer. Do please add your tuppence-worth in the Comments section.

There is a tendency to regard Hollywood adaptations of foreign films as lazy knock-offs. Whatever induced them to take Godard’s joyful New Wave game-changer A Bout de Souffle and remake it as the hollow 1980s Richard Gere vehicle Breathless? But there are honourable exceptions. Here’s my Top 10, in no particular order:

for-a-fistful-of-dollars-pictures-12A Fistful of Dollars (1964). This is the film that single-handedly invented the Spaghetti Western genre, and turned Clint Eastwood from the clean-cut, yawnsome hunk of TV’s Rawhide to an edgy counter-cultural anti-hero. It is also heavily based on Kurosawa’s Yojimbo, a fact which landed director Sergio Leone with a hefty lawsuit. But since Kurosawa himself was inspired by Westerns, notably the films of John Ford, perhaps it’s a fair cultural trade.

magseven-e1314596581742The Magnificent Seven (1960). I couldn’t claim that this is better, artistically, than Kurosawa’s masterly The Seven Samurai, on which it is based (the original script was more faithful than what the studio eventually produced). But it was a classic of its time. A remake is due in 2017.

a-the-departed-HD-WallpaperThe Departed (2006). For me, the Hong Kong original, Internal Affairs, is tighter than the Scorsese version, though it finally won him the Best Director Oscar he’d been denied for so long. But this is certainly a gripping piece of film-making, with the wonderful central premise intact: an undercover police agent is placed within a criminal gang; a gangster is placed undercover within the police force; each must uncover the other without blowing their cover. Confused much?

willis12 Monkeys (1995). Great though the French short La Jetée is, 12 Monkeys goes the Whole Gilliam, taking Hollywood’s then biggest action star (Bruce Willis) and weaving around him a nigh-on incomprehensible, genre-bending dystopian sci-fi with philosophical heft.

true-lies-arnold-schwarzenegger-jamie-lee-curtis1True Lies (1994). If you like Arnie films (and I do, I do!), this loose remake of 1991’s La Totale is a superior example of the genre. Directed and written by James Cameron, it was at the time the most expensive movie ever made. Until Titanic, of course.

Vanilla_Sky_G_01Vanilla Sky (2001). Amenábar’s original Open Your Eyes was excellent, but Vanilla Sky has direction from Cameron Crowe and Tom Cruise at the peak of his powers, and even had the good grace to retain Penélope Cruz in her original role. How the BBC’s otherwise wonderful Life on Mars thought it could get away with lifting the rooftop scenes after not one but two films had used it, however, I don’t know.

InsomniaInsomnia (2002). I haven’t seen the apparently excellent Norwegian film on which this is faithfully based, but Christopher Nolan’s adaptation is certainly a goodie. It contains one of Robin Williams’ least annoying roles, and even Pacino is prevented from going over the top.

Some_like_it_hotSome Like It Hot (1959). I haven’t seen the 1951 original of this, either: Fanfaren der Liebe. But no comedy could possibly beat the chemistry of Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon in drag, Marilyn Monroe at Peak Sex, and the genius of director Billy Wilder. “Nobody’s perfect”? This film is.

Let-Me-In---2010-007Let Me In (2010). There’s no question that the original modern vampire pic Let The Right One In was better. But the adaptation that followed it with indecent haste was not far off it, thanks largely to a typically precocious performance by Chloë Grace Moretz.

birdcageThe Birdcage (1996). This kind of ultra-broad farce is not really my cup of tea; and the American adaptation is even broader than the French La Cage Aux Folles. All the same, it can be a joy to see Robin Williams and Nathan Lane, as the drag queen who has to play it straight to impress their son’s potential in-laws, go way over the top. Hank Azaria as the butler is flat-out hilarious.

Do you prefer The Ring to Ringu? Clooney’s Solaris to Tarkovsky’s? Have your say in Comments, below.

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The London Screenwriters’ Festival: 10 amazing seminars in one handy guide

10 Dec
London Screenwriters' Festival founder and director, the inspirational Chris Jones, takes to the stage

London Screenwriters’ Festival founder and director, the inspirational Chris Jones, takes to the stage

The London Screenwriters’ Festival is the largest of its kind in the world. That’s right, the biggest and best event for screenwriters happens not in LA, not in New York, but right here. London, Hollywood indeed. I’ve written up all the best talks, screenings and seminars I attended at this year’s: that’s ten blog posts. Read ’em, one by one. You’ll laugh! You’ll learn!

Behind The Scenes

The Silence of the Lambs, with screenwriter Ted Tally. Discover the secrets of the famous jail scene between Clarice and Hannibal, how Jodie Foster got the part, and whose head is really in the jar. Part one, click here; part two, click here.

Finding Nemo, with co-writer David Reynolds. Find out: Why is the vegetarian shark called “Bruce”? How did Sean Penn narrowly miss being in the film? And why did Pixar have to make their animation, in parts, deliberately bad?

The Lost Boys, with director Joel Schumacher. Find out: How was Rambo an influence on the movie? How you do you get maggots to act? Why must Surf Nazis die? Where did Kiefer Sutherland go in full vampire make-up?

Great talkers

Joel Schumacher. The veteran director explains how Woody Allen changed his life, how the studio took fright at Falling Down with Michael Douglas, and how “if I can do this, you can do this too”.

Lynda La Plante. The writer of Prime Suspect, who is currently working on the prequel, tells how she made it as a screenwriter. Find out why her key tip is to “write like a transvestite trucker”.

Tony Jordan. The creator of Life on Mars and the forthcoming Dickensian talks about his long, illustrious and surprisingly accidental career. He explains how he nearly gave up after just a few episodes of EastEnders (he went on to write 250), and how Life on Mars came about.

Charlie Brooker. The sweet, avuncular, cuddly uncle of screenwriting – just kidding! – trains his bile on blockbusters (“like staring into a washing machine full of cars and robots and things all smashing together”) and writing itself (“I love having written, but I hate the process of writing”), and talks about the Black Mirror Christmas special.

Writers’ guides

Beyond The Chick Flick: Writing The Female-Driven Screenplay, with Pilar Alessandra. Sigourney Weaver’s part in Alien was originally written for a man. But though it can be useful to ask yourself “what would a man typically do?” when writing for women, you’re missing out on a whole lot of depth if that’s all you do…

The Art & Craft of Dialogue, with Claudia Myers. She outlines the five pillars of what makes a good scene, and the four pillars of what makes good dialogue within that scene. Learn how even the way you address someone can matter: “In The Graduate, Dustin Hoffman and Anne Bancroft are sleeping together, but he’s still calling her ‘Mrs.Robinson’.”

Bonus section: last year’s highlights

A whole lotta Joe Eszterhas: The straight-talking author of The Devil’s Guide to Hollywood, who used to be paid $4 million for a script, was so entertaining and larger-than-life he could not possibly fit into one blog. So I posted several, including a, ahem, blow-by-blow account of Basic Instinct, his troubles with Mel Gibson, and his tips on writing.

Creating Character, with Pilar Alessandra. How to brainstorm a film structure from scratch, based solely on character (fascinating!); plus the three dimensions to character, and how to introduce a character in a script.

The Epic Spec: How To Explode Onto The Hollywood Scene, with Stuart Hazeldine. “Sometimes, to get noticed, you have to take your clothes off and run in the traffic.”

Steve Pemberton. One of the League Of Gentlemen team gives a local talk for local people. Discover, too, how a director he didn’t previously know persuaded him to act, for free, in his short film, as a cannibalistic serial killer with agoraphobia.

Graham Linehan. Absolutely one of the top TV comedy writers working today: the man behind Father Ted, Black Books and The IT Crowd reveals how Robert McKee screwed him up, and what the Three Moments rule is for TV comedy.

The London Screenwriters’ Festival 2015 is pre-registering now, and already 37% sold out. Find out more here.

LSF report #1: Tony Jordan on going from Albert Square to Life on Mars

27 Oct
Tony Jordan

Tony Jordan at Dickens’s home in Kent, for a BBC4 programme on Great Expectations. Jordan’s 20-part drama Dickensian will air on BBC One next year.

The London Screenwriters’ Festival was an incredible three days of talks, events, seminars, pitches and networking. Each day this week, and probably well into next, I’ll post a new nugget from the festival. These include wildly entertaining chats with Lynda La Plante, Charlie Brooker and Tony “Life On Mars” Jordan; commentaries on Lost Boys, Finding Nemo, and Silence of the Lambs; and some “how-to” classes on scriptwriting.

I’ve kicked it all off with a news story in The Times today. It’s mostly about Tony Jordan’s forthcoming BBC One series, Dickensian, so let’s start off here with more life-lessons from the irrepressible Tony:

1. You have to blag it: EastEnders was my very first job as a writer. I wrote a script by accident – that is, I was chatting to a friend who was trying to get into television, and if he was collecting butterflies I would probably have collected butterflies, but as it is, I wrote a script. I had a pitch in a market so they somehow thought I was an East End barrow boy, even though I was raised just outside Liverpool. So after that I was Dick Van Dyke, I had to pretend to be Cockney. It stuck for 15 years until I was told there was a magazine wanting to do a feature about me growing up in the East End and I had to come clean.

2. You must hold on to your voice: We all have a unique voice as a writer. The problem is, when you go to soaps, they say “we want your voice”, but they don’t really; they want all the episodes to sound the same. So I did what any writer would do: I watched an episode, paused it, counted the scenes. Dissected it. After a few episodes I realised the structure was always the same.

There’s always a cliffhanger at the end, and that’s your North Star, you’re aiming for that. That then gives you your first image, because it has to be connected in some way. Chuck in another three or four narrative staging posts, and you can cover all that in about ten minutes. I worked out that left me 20 minutes to myself. When you see an episode with all the men in one corner of the Queen Vic having conversations that begin “The trouble with women is…” and all the women in another corner going “The trouble with men is…”, and juxtaposing them in an interesting way, that’s me.

3. You will have to deal with twats like Andrew. There was this twat [at the BBC] called Andrew, I can’t even remember his second name he was that much of a twat. He had me, a 34-year-old father of three, used to fist fights at 6am to safeguard my pitch, sitting on my back doorstep sobbing like a child. I very nearly gave up EastEnders at that time, after about eight scripts [he went on to do about 250]. On his first script meeting with Ashley Pharoah [who later co-created Life on Mars], Andrew picked up his script, held his nose, dropped it in the bin, and said “Shall we start again?”

When you recognise the twats, you have to get away from them as soon as you can. Or strike them physically.

4. Just write the truth. I was expelled from school at 14, so I didn’t understand the frames of reference when they’d talk in meetings about Brecht or Shakespeare or Dickens. But I eventually discovered there is no secret. It’s just writing down the truth on a bit of paper.

Hustle

Hustle: breaking the fourth wall

5. You can break the rules – for a reason. When I was writing Hustle, I got stuck. I had to explain all the cons to the reader and it was just pages and pages of exposition, like wading through treacle. I phoned Jane Featherstone at Kudos and said “It won’t work,” and she said okay, if we can’t make it we can’t, but just have a Bacardi and a bit of a think; relax.

So a couple of days later it hits me: when we have exposition, we just freeze it, and have the actors talk directly to the audience. Jane had the imagination to say, “That sounds pretty f***ing weird, but you know what, let’s do it. We’ll either make history, or we’ll never work again.”

6. Rejection is not the end. I had this great idea, and gave it someone, and they said, “We can never make that. It’s too silly.” Too silly. Right. No getting round that. But someone else later took it on. That was Life on Mars. So it’s not necessarily that the script is bad, it’s just not right for someone.

I also had this idea for a show about the making of a soap, which would be paralleled on alternative nights by the soap itself. It stayed in my bottom drawer for 12 years until a new head came in at ITV, and said they wanted to break the mould and take risks. I said, funny you should say that, I have just the thing…

Life on Mars

Life on Mars: dreamt up in Blackpool with £1,000 in carrier bags

7. There is life on Mars. At EastEnders we used to do these away-days, 14 writers in Badminton House playing poker and getting drunk. That’s why I stayed so long, to go to the story conferences! So I pitched to Kudos that they give me £1,000 in expenses, in three carrier bags, for me and two writers to go to Blackpool. We would work till 4.30pm, then our time’s our own. So we arrived at Blackpool train station, and found this poor runner standing there on the platform, who gave us our carrier bags full of cash.

One of the ideas to come out of this session was Legion [which Watch has now commissioned as ten hour-long programmes], and another was Life on Mars. I recently found a photo from those days and it has a flip-chart with “’70s cop show” with a big ring round it. Life on Mars came about for one simple reason: we wanted to write for The Sweeney, but it wasn’t on anymore. We thought we could never sell a ‘70s cop show, so we thought “let’s put a spin on it”. Doing a time-travel cop show wasn’t done because we saw a gap in the market, it wasn’t ground-breaking, it was three pissed writers who wanted to write for The Sweeney.

8. At some stage, you may want to set up your own production company [Tony’s is Red Planet]. Sometimes, when I created a series, they wouldn’t want me involved in anything but the scripts. I don’t want to just put the script up someone’s arse and the DVD comes out their ear.